babelkunst
english / norsk

Photo: Dag-Arve Forbergskog


















Han Sam Son:






Alyssa Taylor Wendt:


Heather Passmore:

Nayoungim - Maass:


Aeneas Wilder:

Mark Clare:





Humberto Duque:

Chris Bell:

Heather Passmore:

Han Sam Son:



Hideki Kanno:



Alyssa Taylor Wendt:




Nayoungim - Maass:





Nayoungim - Maass - Moldenauer:

Marnie Moldenauer:

 


The Artist as a Nomad


In our time of rapidly expanding possibilities for communication and information, particularly since the 90s, as well as a substantial increase in the number possible flight destinations, travelling has increasingly become the hallmark of our time. Expanded travelling, communication and migration has influenced our existence, and enhanced our global awareness and understanding. One may say that the world has become larger: We have attained a better insight into and a more profound knowledge of different cultures and may confirm that what is local has become global. At the same time, one may claim that the world has become smaller: It feels closer, more available, and many places (often the metropolises) resemble one another, and that which is global is perceived locally.
            In our time globalization is seen as the cause of several processes of cultural change, but there is disagreement concerning its influence on our common understanding of culture, geography, history and identity. The sceptics declare that globalization leads to cultural homogenization where a new common culture takes over at the expense of the original distinctive local character. In this context, globalization is regarded as an economic phenomenon, in the shape of capitalism, and as capitalism is a western phenomenon, its effect will be perceived as westernization or cultural imperialism. According to the opposite view, globalization opens up for a cultural diversity which accentuates differences and serves to enrich. Lademoen Art Nomads is an attempt to make visible art produced in today’s global context, art that strives to oppose standardization and homogenous commercialism. We wish to investigate how cultural globalization and increased travelling shapes consciousness beyond national and regional identity, how contemporary artists may be said to base their work on global awareness, and how this is manifested in their art.
            Historically, artists have had a tradition for seeking out new places to exchange knowledge, ideas and impulses. Since the 18th century the classical educational journey as a means of achieving cultural knowledge has been a ritual for young men of the upper class, and has since escalated into today’s tourism. More and more artists renounce a permanent address and choose to travel between various residencies in different countries. Many of them have turned travelling and working in new places into a lifestyle to such an extent that they may be regarded as nomads, working in accordance with the persuasion that identity is not attached to a locality. This artistic exchange has increased in step with the geographical extension of the field of contemporary art during the last 15 - 20 years, where important biennals and exhibitions have been arranged in countries and parts of the world formerly excluded from the geographical centre of the art nucleus.  And where artists, curators and gallerists are engaged from other places than Europe and the US.
            By calling today’s travelling artists nomads, we underline the fact that they to a great extent focus on their surroundings, exploring new territories and seeking a community irrespective of national borders. The artists’ exchange suggests a creolization of cultures. The term is borrowed from the field of linguistics and is used to describe how a mixed language is developed and used to communicate across language barriers. Through creolization a new culture emerges, the result of combining several cultures, and the nomad artist becomes a link who translates the values of individual cultural groups and attaches this to a global network.
            The works of the invited artists take the shape of temporary installations in the public space of the Lademo Park and installations at Babel and in the Lademo Church. We will meet a multitude of artistic expressions and themes including biographical anecdotes, different kinds of communication, migration of biotopes, global consequences of local actions, spreading of virus, Ping-Pong as a power game, the alienating effect of new destinations, poetical activist slogans, a Japanese wedding and a drawn evolutionary process. The nomads at Lademoen thus express a global orientation and a nomadic community through their different approaches.


Text by Margrete Abelsen, Project Leader at Babel
Translation by Birgit Kvamme Lundheim